Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Time Flies When You're Not Having Fun

Wow!  Where did November go?  Since my darling mom-in-law fell and broke her leg, the weeks have flown by in a rush of hospital visits, doctor visits, rehab facility set-ups..... you name it.  All the non-joys of getting old(er).  It doesn't take much to knock my schedule sideways and this was Very Much.

Gardening? Oh, please! My gardens no longer know who I am.  My beautiful To-Do List of autumn chores, carefully planned so that each garden bed would be ready for the cold winter months, will never be accomplished. Now, it's a matter of doing a bit here and there, mostly to enjoy what lovely days are left to us.

What's happening in the garden?  Oh, my.  We are FEASTING on pineapple guava (Feijoa sellowiana), which is our favorite fruit in the world. (And, I have to point out that since fruits have long been our specialty, that's really saying something.) It's taken five years to really get the bushes going but the rewards ..... (happy lip smacking)....  This is perhaps the fruit I most recommend to SE Virginia gardeners - such a lovely evergreen bush/tree, stunning flowers and, finally, amazing fruits.

Life, even in the midst of calamity, is good.

3 comments:

  1. You're right! Where did November go? Hope your mom-in-law mends quickly!

    The fruit looks very nice. What is the taste comparable to?

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  2. Oh, Veggie - it's almost impossible to say WHAT they taste like. I fed some to a group from SECEP's horticulture program the other day and the final determination was that they taste like a "kiwi-lime with bubblegum". Go figure! Two friends call it my "pina-colada" fruit. I can tell you that nothing else tastes like them - or is as good. It's as "tropical" as we get! Perhaps next year we'll have to hold a Feijoa tasting event!?

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  3. Well those descriptions sounds tasty enough for me to try growing some!

    Feijoa sellowiana is the name to look for to get the same type you enjoy, right?

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