Thursday, November 26, 2009

Thanksgiving Feasting


Feast!  Thanks to the unusually mild weather, we have lots of lettuces and greens from our raised beds for our Thanksgiving feast.  It was wonderful to stop at Culliphers' Farm Market yesterday to pick up a HUGE basket full of red skinned potatoes, butternut squash, some kind of delightful little acorn-type squash and THREE kinds of sweet potatoes: red, white and purple. Go figure. I think I'm going to try my own sweet potato chips with this medley - like those ones we buy for outrageous prices.  And, on top of it all, a monster-sized bag of collards and another equally generous bad of curly kale. Fresh broccoli.... it's all good.

After recently reading reports that there are NO supermarkets in inner Detroit - nowhere at all for families to buy groceries or fresh food, I am deeply grateful that we have such wonderful small farms around us.  I am also grateful to be able to grow fresh food of my own, enough to have and also to share.  The news articles about Detroit indicated that grants had been set up to help a businessman start up new small groceries in some of these inner city neighborhoods.  At the same time, dedicated volunteers are working to establish community gardens to teach folks how to grow simple vegetables: in plots, in yards, in containers.  

It's really not hard to grow food.  Sometimes we make things so over-complicated with useless rules: you have to plant a certain way, you must look for certain varieties, you must test your soil, you must water and fertilize "just so"..... Folks, we were growing food when there was nothing available but a little dirt, a little water, some seeds and a stick to dig with.  More than half the individual farmers in the world are still growing exactly that way. 

Dig in! Plan to plant a little more this coming spring. Plan to share a little more of what you plant.  And give a special word of thanks this holiday for the hard-working men and women - small farmers, ranchers and fishing folks, market owners and workers, migrant workers in the fields, even that generous gardener down the street who gifts you with squash and tomatoes every summer......to all of them we say Namaste' and Thanks for all the food!

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The sharing of ideas, experience and helpful information between one gardener and another has always been the very best of gardening traditions.