Thursday, February 5, 2009

Planning the Veggie Garden - Early Spring


Let the cold winds blow, indoors the gardeners are insulated from the outdoor chill by the piles of garden seed catalogs stacked around them. It's seed ordering time! At last count, I saw twenty some garden catalogs decorating our coffee table, dining room table and spread open across the arms of the couch. Even as the coldest month moves into Hampton Roads, gardeners are already into the springtime, planning their first garden plantings. I braved the 28 degrees and blowing winds to pace through our raised beds one more time, plotting what my first plantings should be.


I already feel "late", ordering my early spring garden seeds. Our region's weather surprises me every year. All the way into March I'm still thinking it's too cold, too early to plant. By the time I get my sugar pod peas (Oh, joy! Oh, deliciousness!) into the ground in late April and growing - wham! - hot weather! I still have to adjust to 80 degree temperatures in May and start planting those peas while my frigid body assures me that it's too, too early. I think this year I may try planting our raised bed pea patch in late March rather than April. I don't have to worry about cold, wet, pea-rotting clay soil in the raised beds. I remember peas coming up through the snow up north, so I suspect I've been much too careful in the past. I'm looking forward to hearing from some other pea-loving gardeners - has anyone gotten the timing down? (shown Sugar Snap Peas - CooksGarden.com)

2 comments:

  1. I've always been too late planting my peas as well so I figured I'd do what the instructions on the package say - to plant them anytime between February - April or as soon as the soil can be worked. I planted my first peas today 2/9/09.

    Phyllis R.

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  2. I'm with you, Phyllis! I think mine are going in today (2/11/09) wind or no wind!!! Let's keep in touch to see how each of our pea plantings tu out. - Sybil

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